I am Mystified by Fusibles

I think that the world is divided into two types of people: those who understand fusibles and those who do not. I am one of those who doesn't.


Mistyfuse is one of those
fusible webs that quilters
rave about.

It's probably because I had some very bad fusible experiences when I first started using them that I have never felt attracted to fusibles since. If I need to reinforce a garment, I prefer to turn to silk organza. But organza can only go so far.

I have met people who seriously rhapsodize about one particular fusible brand or another.  Their ardor is almost akin to a spiritual experience, and I am assuming this is because they are getting results that far far exceed their expectations.

True, most of these who go on and on about the amazing fusibles are serious quilters and I am more of a garment person, but I have to admit that there must be something to what they are saying. I am sure that there are applications in garments that could be equally outstanding.

With that in mind, Mistyfuse is definitely one of those that falls into the camp of absolute adoration. So I am happy to announce that we have an awesome MistyFuse kit that includes the very cool Mistyfuse Ultraviolet, along with some great publications and patterns to give you plenty of ideas for using it. Check it out in the Sew Daily shop.

Do you love fusibles? Any in particular? I would love to know!

Happy stitching!

 

 

 

 

 

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About Amber

Amber Eden is the editor of Stitch and SewDaily.com. She LOVES sewing and editing Stitch and SewDaily.com. She also loves dance, yoga, iced decaf triple espressos, and her two golden retrievers. She divides her time between Boston and New York.

12 thoughts on “I am Mystified by Fusibles

  1. I too am a garment sewer, moved to art dolls and now art quilting. I have been using fusibles for several years, first in garments the in my art dolls and quilting. In garments I learned from seventh avenue sample room sewers how to layer interfacings to get the results I wanted. However in art quilts, to me Misty fuse is the best. Misty Fuse does not change the drape of the fabric so you can treat the fabric without worrying about bulk. Also my needle does not accumulate residue from the fusible. I love it.

  2. I have been using interfacing both fusible and sewn in from Fashion Sewing Supply, a company owned by Pamela Erny. Her supplies are high quality and easy to use if one follows the directions. Pamela also has many tips on her blog. I am not in any way affiliated with her company.
    Kathy C.

  3. I find that wonder under works for me, I haven’t tried misty fuse, the one thing that is
    most important with all fusibles is read and follow their directions because they are all different, both by brand and by weight of the fusible and the fabric.

  4. I find that wonder under works for me, I haven’t tried misty fuse, the one thing that is
    most important with all fusibles is read and follow their directions because they are all different, both by brand and by weight of the fusible and the fabric.

  5. I don’t know about any one else, I just don’t like any kind of nonwoven interfacing. I had several terrible catastrophes using pellon or any other nonwoven, whether sew in or iron on. The non woven seems to pill and bleed through the fabric over time. So I do not waste my talent/gift or time on non woven.

  6. I love fusibles for bags, particularly multipocket bags, messenger style. Different weights for different parts of the bag, depending upon style and intended use. Otherwise, as you, I am inclined to use silk organza or “fairy” cloth (it is wonderful, from Switzerland, I believe) for linen garments.

  7. I love fusibles for bags, particularly multipocket bags, messenger style. Different weights for different parts of the bag, depending upon style and intended use. Otherwise, as you, I am inclined to use silk organza or “fairy” cloth (it is wonderful, from Switzerland, I believe) for linen garments.

  8. I have used fusibles in art quilts, regular quilt appliques, and as a stiffener when needed in other sewing applications. My most recent success was using it to back a thinner quilting fabric to give it more body so I could make a nice pillow cover for the bench we sit on by the door to put on and take off shoes and boots. I used Pellon Shape Flex SF101. It worked great. I will have to give Misty Fuse a try.

  9. I have used fusibles in art quilts, regular quilt appliques, and as a stiffener when needed in other sewing applications. My most recent success was using it to back a thinner quilting fabric to give it more body so I could make a nice pillow cover for the bench we sit on by the door to put on and take off shoes and boots. I used Pellon Shape Flex SF101. It worked great. I will have to give Misty Fuse a try.

  10. I have used fusibles in art quilts, regular quilt appliques, and as a stiffener when needed in other sewing applications. My most recent success was using it to back a thinner quilting fabric to give it more body so I could make a nice pillow cover for the bench we sit on by the door to put on and take off shoes and boots. I used Pellon Shape Flex SF101. It worked great. I will have to give Misty Fuse a try.

  11. Hi Amber!
    I use Thermoweb Ultrahold Heat N Bond as fusible web, and as patterns to make my washable, fabric picture frames and washable, fabric brooch pin jewelry. The Ultrahold is acid-free, but you can also use their Heat N Bond Lite or Featherlite. They are all paper backed, iron on fabric “adhesive that acts great as fusible web and patterns. And thermowebonline.com now offers 10 sheets of their EZprint Heat N Bond Lite and Featherlite, which hass double sided paper backing, allowing you to print your patterns directly to the sheets, cut to size, and iron to the back of fabrics. $7.99 The Heat N Bond Lite and Ultrahold are available at A.C. Moore and Michaels by the 5 yard roll (Michael’s is cheaper when buying it with their coupons), Jo-Ann’s by the yard, and other places. I pledge by this stuff, and have used Ultrahold exclusively in making my fabric picture frames, from when they were non washable, to washable and sewn, and soon, no sew and washable. Thanks for allowing me to share! Kristie

  12. I prefer the iron on kind especially when hand sewing something with a narrow hem or doing folded fabric projects. Or the other kind that you can sew on to give the fabric some weight.

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