Bring Low-Tech Fun Into Child's Play

Growing up my family had a cabin in the mountains that (still) has no electricity, only cold running water and an outhouse. It is very rustic to say the least. Both of my parents were teachers which meant that the family would spend 3 entire months up in the middle of nowhere with no television, no phones, and of course no social media or Game Boys. Only electronic item we had was an AM radio.


Family Cabin


Low tech toys
  

  Hot Pink Matchbox Cars

So what is a kid to do for 3 entire months?! For one, I learned to sew on a treadle sewing machine and made stuff, a lot of stuff. I played with paper dolls, and made villages in a dried out creek bed. See the pink Matchbox car? My village was quite fancy to say the least.

I made a blanket for my stuffed dog (named Snoopy), went for hikes every day, played by the lake, was bitten by a poisonous spider and almost lost my thumb as a result. I made mud pies, made up songs on my recorder and stitched up finger puppets. I used the finger puppets with my friend Annie (who lived in the cabin down the road) and we would put on shows at the 'theater' which was actually a stick fort we built. We'd make our dogs sit as audience members. My dog was the critic and would invariably get bored and leave. What do critics know anyway.

Thinking back on my summers I count myself lucky. Can you image having 3 months of no social media, no phones, no Internet? Almost hard to imagine. I know a lot of parents that long to bring a bit of low-tech/no-tech toys into their children's lives.

When Forest Friends Finger Puppet Kit came on my desk looking through it brought back all those memories of a truly laid back, no-tech summer. These little puppets are so cute, are easy to make, and I can almost guarantee that this type of activity will be remembered far longer that getting a high score on Angry Birds.

What I would love to know is how you spent your summers or if you have kids or grand kids what do you do when you turn off the Game Boy? Let me know in the comment section below!

 

Happy Sewing!

 

 

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Jill

About Jill

I am the Online Editor for Sew Daily and I am so incredibly excited to meet everyone here on this amazing sewing community!

My first passion is garment sewing, I love vintage sewing patterns and working with knits and silks. I also get very jazzed about sewing pants and love learning couture techniques. What about you? I can't wait to get started finding out more about you and what you like to sew.

5 thoughts on “Bring Low-Tech Fun Into Child's Play

  1. I was also a creative child though our house had electricity and hot water. I was always trying to make something out of ‘nothing’ (or re-purposing found objects). When I was 8 years old, our b&w television broke and my folks couldn’t afford to fix or get a new one so my mom started taking us to the Library at least once a week. She also signed permission for us to check books from the grown-up section and I headed right for the craft books. She started checking out craft magazines and we worked on family projects such as candy-making, glass mosaics, faux batiks…. One summer, I spent most of it and all of my allowance trying to build a miniature heddle loom from a diagram in a book. Never did get it to work but I enjoyed the heck out of building it.

  2. When my 8 year old grandson comes every summer we run thru the sprinklers, take walks, play basketball at the local elementary school and just play. We lay on the grass and try to figure out what the clouds look like. We don’t have video games, etc at my house. He wasn’t too sure of it at first, but he loves it now. When our granddaughter comes, we knit or sew or some kind of hand work. We just have fun without being plugged in. And, because of that, we really get to know each other.

  3. When my 8 year old grandson comes every summer we run thru the sprinklers, take walks, play basketball at the local elementary school and just play. We lay on the grass and try to figure out what the clouds look like. We don’t have video games, etc at my house. He wasn’t too sure of it at first, but he loves it now. When our granddaughter comes, we knit or sew or some kind of hand work. We just have fun without being plugged in. And, because of that, we really get to know each other.

  4. I lived in a small town, with a pony that I could bridle (he was very patient) and take out by myself, and a dog that would follow. One summer they tore up part of a brick street. Four or five of us neighborhood kids proceeded to turn the stacked bricks into a rather elaborate “town” of our own. We played in the creek, roller skated (no fun on brick, we discovered), and generally avoided grownups as much as possible. When no one was available, I spent hours at the Library, located across the street from my house and read everything available. My kids grew up out in the country and had to amuse themselves. Saying “I’m bored” led to dreaded assignments such as room-cleaning, so they were very adept at finding things to make and do. Cooking and sewing were unisex activities, as were outdoor chores and later, motor vehicle maintenance. TV was not turned on until after supper, if then.

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