Create a Clever and Pretty Nametag Pouch

Being creative is all about the finishing touches and having the very best nametag pouch ever is definitely a great finishing touch, as well as very practical. Create an embellished nametag pouch by Susan Brubaker Knapp from the Quilting Arts TV 900 series to carry your nametag when you go to shows and other events . Slide your nametag into the plastic sleeve and put your necessities—credit card, cash, lip balm, and hotel key—into the concealed pocket under the flap, and you're ready to go!

 

Nametag pouch by Susan Brubaker Knapp.

Materials

For one pouch:

• Medium-weight sew-in interfacing (such as PellonR 910)

• Cotton fabric, 1 fat quarter

• Medium-weight clear upholstery vinyl, 5" × 3  3⁄4" piece

• Ribbon (or a strip of fabric cut along the selvedge), 1⁄4" × 26"

For the owl version:

• Copyright-free clip art (A source is graphicsfairy.blogspot.com.)

• Fine-tip permanent marker for fabric (such as a Micron PigmaR pen)

• Orange cotton fabric for moon,

5" × 5" piece

For the embroidered version:

• Hand-dyed perle cotton or embroidery floss

• Threads collected from fabric after it comes out of the dryer

• Embroidery needle

For the leaf version:

• Leaf stencil (Used here, one by The Crafters Workshop called Ginko Leaves, available at shop.quiltingdaily.com.)

• Metallic gold acrylic fabric paint

To Make the Pouch

The pouch consists of two separate elements: one long rectangle for the back of the pouch (this piece includes the flap, which will fold over to cover half of the front), and a shorter rectangle for the pouch front (the lower portion of this piece includes the vinyl pocket for the nametag). In Figures 1–5, these two elements are labeled as “Part A” and “Part B”respectively.

1. From the cotton fabric, cut: 

• 2 rectangles 5" × 13"

• 2 rectangles 5" × 8"

2. From the interfacing, cut:

• 1 rectangle 4 1/2" × 12 1/2"

• 1 rectangle 4 1/2" × 7 1/2"

3. Center the 4 1/2" × 12 1/2" piece of interfacing on the wrong side of one of the 5" × 13" fabric rectangles, and pin. Machine baste the interfacing to the fabric and remove the pins.

4. Place the remaining 5" × 13" fabric rectangle on the interfaced rectangle, right sides together, and pin. On the side with the interfacing, and starting on one of the short sides, stitch around the perimeter with a 1⁄4" seam allowance, leaving a 2" opening for turning.

5. Clip the corners close to the seam and turn right-side out. Gently push out the corners with a blunt-tipped instrument (such as a knitting needle). Tuck the opening closed and press. Remove the basting threads.

6. Fold down the top 4 1/2" and press to complete the construction of Part A; set aside. (Figures 1 and 2) Note that you will decorate the flap after the pouch is completely constructed.

7. Center the 4 1/2" × 7 1/2" piece of interfacing on the wrong side of one of the 5" × 8" fabric rectangles, and pin. Machine baste the interfacing to the fabric and remove the pins.

8. Place the remaining 5" × 8" fabric rectangle right side up on your work surface. Position the vinyl piece at the bottom, aligned with the bottom edge. You can use a little masking tape to hold it in position, if necessary.

9. Place the first 5" × 8" piece (with the interfacing basted to it) on top, right side down (interfacing on

top).

10. Starting on the short side that does not have the upholstery vinyl, stitch around the perimeter with
a 1/4" seam allowance, leaving a 2" opening for turning.

11. Clip the corners close to the seam and turn right-side out. Gently push out the corners with a blunt-tipped instrument. Make sure that the vinyl is on the front, not on the side with the basting.

12. Tuck the opening closed and press. Caution: Take care not to melt the upholstery vinyl with your iron! When you press Part B, do it quickly, and from the fabric side only.

13. Remove the basting threads.

14. Topstitch 1⁄8" along the top edge to close the opening. This completes the construction of Part B. (Figure 3)

15. Place Part A so that the side that will be the inside lining is facing up. Place Part B on top of it, vinyl pocket side up.

16. Tuck one end of your ribbon between Part A and Part B on the left side, and the other end on the right side, being sure to position the ends so they will get stitched into the side seams. (Figure 4)

17. Stitch Part B to Part A along both sides and the bottom, forming a pocket. Fold the top flap down. (Figure 5)

18. Embellish as desired (see“Finishing the Flaps”).

Finishing the Flaps

Here are instructions for finishing the pouches the way I did. Feel free to embellish and finish your pouches with your own unique twist.

For the embroidered version

Embellish with hand-dyed perle cotton or embroidery floss and thread collected from fabric after it comes out of the dryer. Use a combination of simple running stitches and French knots to stitch down the threads and create a simple geometric design.

For the leaf version

Stencil a leaf onto the flap using a leaf stencil and metallic gold acrylic fabric paint. Free-motion machine stitch around the motif and stitch in the background on the flap.

For the owl version

Print out a piece of copyright-free clip art or your own artwork, and trace it onto a circle of orange fabric using a fine-tip permanent marker for fabric. Hand or machine stitch the circle to the flap and free-motion machine-stitch around the motif.

You can get more great sewing projects like this from the Quilting Arts TV, Series 600 – 900. Right now each episode is available for a 10 cent download.

Do you have any favorite crossover sewing projects that you have made. Share them on the SewDaily.com blog.  

Happy stitching!

 

 

 

 

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Amber

About Amber

Amber Eden is the editor of Stitch and SewDaily.com. She LOVES sewing and editing Stitch and SewDaily.com. She also loves dance, yoga, iced decaf triple espressos, and her two golden retrievers. She divides her time between Boston and New York.

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