Which Style Apron Do You Prefer?

Every Tuesday morning, our office gathers for "Show and Tell," where we bring in art or handmade items we've been working on in our personal time.  From editors to designers, from sewists to mixed media artists, we've got a range of talent at our office.

Cook's Apron, by Charise Randell.

Last week was no different, and some great projects were on display. We saw one editor's completed table runner, another's yarn spinning project, and a photo of a sculpture our intern is working on. Our new designer even had an apron she had sewn. 

As we passed the apron around the room, a few people commented on what style apron they prefer. Some like an apron with a full front to wipe hands on and protect against spills, while others preferred the skirt-only type.

I fall into the full-front camp. I'm more of a baker than a cook, so I'm prone to batter flying out of my mixing bowl and landing on me, or getting dusted with dry ingredients. I need all the coverage I can get.

In our recent The Unofficial Downton Abbey Sews special issue of Stitch, we have a full-front version, the Cook's Apron, by Charise Randell. The apron is made with eyelet and gingham, and is absolutely adorable. I've always loved yellow, and in this project it gives the apron a bright, sunny feel.

If you're looking for an apron to sew, check out the Cook's Apron in The Unofficial Downton Abbey Sews special issue, available in the Sew Daily Shop. The shop is also offering  The Unofficial Downton Abbey Collection, pairing the magazine with a cookbook.

What are your thoughts on apron styles? Do you enjoy sewing aprons, or other kitchen accessories? I can't wait to hear. 

 

 

Other sewing topics you may enjoy:

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Aprons
Abby Kaufman

About Abby Kaufman

Abby Kaufman is assistant editor of Stitch magazine. When she's not scoping out new fabrics for her collection, Abby enjoys outdoor activities, and spending time with her husband and two dogs. 

13 thoughts on “Which Style Apron Do You Prefer?

  1. I concur on the full-front apron. Sometimes I think coveralls or a hazmat suit would be more appropriate, but they would be too hot for North Florida. I really dislike aprons that tie around the neck, and am always looking for patterns with straps that cross in the back.

  2. I love aprons and wear them every day! My favorite style is a vintage, homemade one that I found years ago. It covers the front completely and has sort of a “T” back with button closing, no ties at the neck or waist. I made a pattern from it and like to use wild, colorful prints! It only takes a yard so I can splurge on interesting fabric whenever I need a new apron.

  3. I love designing and constructing aprons. The last one was a gift to my daughter. It was a combination of two fabrics…one had skulls and roses on it and the other was a grid that looked like a picket fence with flowers on it. I called it “Guns & Roses meets June Cleaver.” Darling daughter actually wears it out sometimes and always get rave comments.

  4. Definitely full front. I largely only wear aprons to prevent oil and grease from spattering from a hot frying pan, griddle, or wok onto my shirt. Honestly, they would only have to be about hip length to get the job done, but it is nice to have pockets, too. 😛

  5. Making a meal requires effort. To be prepared for this effort, I have to put the apron on. Full length aprons suit me, because I often get distracted from ‘just cooking dinner’ to cooking muffins, or biccies for example. The kitchen aid is wonderful, but I usually to forget to attach the guards before whizzing and seem to end up with flour and butter and whatever else on me. I have a couple of vintage aprons that have been market finds. I love the embroidery on them. Also, I have a couple of half length aprons which are pretty special. One is a vintage market find: pink with ladies in crochet gowns. The other is one my Mum made for me when I was probably no more than 10 years old. I cross-stitched an apple on the pocket. Yes it’s small, but I have it in the cupboard. Sorry I can’t add pics of these.

  6. Working as an American Civil War re-enactor, portraying a cook, I discovered pinner aprons with full skirt and pockets. NO straps, bib pinned to the bodice. Covers the chest and moves with me, no neck strain. Around open hearth or campfire, the apron is tropical weight wool–does not catch fire from sparks.

    At home? Cotton, or poly cotton mix. With a button on towel for wiping hands.

  7. Working as an American Civil War re-enactor, portraying a cook, I discovered pinner aprons with full skirt and pockets. NO straps, bib pinned to the bodice. Covers the chest and moves with me, no neck strain. Around open hearth or campfire, the apron is tropical weight wool–does not catch fire from sparks.

    At home? Cotton, or poly cotton mix. With a button on towel for wiping hands.

  8. I’m a fan of full cover. Baking seems to ingredients fly high ! My favorite type is the type my grandmother always wore it slid over your head and the wide straps cross-crossed on your back and also had a waist tie if you wanted it secure which she never used.

  9. I agree with EllenF, I also need a hazmat suit! I prefer the full apron. I made one for myself and for my granddaughter. Since we sometimes cook together, this was fun to do. C

  10. I agree, if you bake you usually need full-front. Those who do more cooking can get away with a half apron. I need lots of pockets too!
    Thanks, Anita

  11. Men also love to have aprons. I made my partner a mens size apron from a fabric he found while I was actually fabric shopping. It has illustrations or and the words WINE, GARLIC and CHEESE. As it was a quilting weight fabric, we lined with a playful fabric and used the lining to trim upper edge and make the ties. I was able to cut out a wine glass and cheese motifs and applique them on a coordinating tea towel. He can’t wait for us to host a dinner party where he can sport his apron!
    A picture is on moorselmary@wordpress.com

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