Was embroidery your first sewing love, too?

I know that I started sewing when I was very young. I remember watching my grandmother sew at her machine when I was just 5 years old, and her letting me "help" her stitch a seam.


Still embroidering after all these years! I know it's hard to
see, but I recently embroidered tiny flowers on this dress.

But the first real project that I remember completing under my own steam was an embroidery project. I had this bright yellow shirt made from India cotton. I visualized what it would look like embroidered, went out to purchase the embroidery floss, and then stitched simple, colorful flowers along the front placket. I was 10 years old.

I have definitely expanded my sewing repertoire since then, but when I look back, embroidery was what hooked me because I could see my project in my mind and then I created it. That feeling of accomplishment and success was what drove me to go to the next project and the next and the next. And I still have that shirt.

There is just something so alluring about embroidery. I recently embroidered a dress that I found on a sale rack with flowers very similar to those first flowers that I embroidered so many years ago. It's so easy to take some embroidery floss and transform an item from your wardrobe. I highly recommend it!

If you love needlework as well, check out a subscription to Piecework magazine.

Did you first dabble in sewing with embroidery? I would love to know.

Happy stitching!

 

Other sewing topics you may enjoy:

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Hand Embroidery
Amber

About Amber

Amber Eden is the editor of Stitch and SewDaily.com. She LOVES sewing and editing Stitch and SewDaily.com. She also loves dance, yoga, iced decaf triple espressos, and her two golden retrievers. She divides her time between Boston and New York.

20 thoughts on “Was embroidery your first sewing love, too?

  1. Yes, indeed, I did LOTS of embroidery when I was young, but mostly on dishtowels and dresser scarves, not on clothes. But I still have trouble hand sewing which is done forward, while embroidery stitches are done backward.

  2. My grandmother taught me to embroidery at 10 . I embroidered passionately till age 30 when I moved to a farm, started raising sheep and took up spinning. Now my passion is felting and embroidery has come back into my life because it is such a great addition to handmade felt. judithcolvindesigns.com

  3. Yes, embroidery was my first adventure with needle and thread, and I too, still love it. My mother taught me at about 5 yrs old when she was very pregnant with my brother. Then I think I moved on to sewing on buttons. Thus began a 60+ year adventure with needle and thread.

  4. Yes, it was, and thank you for the memories! My grandmother and I were very close and I remember sitting with her learning my first stitches. My first project was pillowcases with purple violets. Lots of purple violets! It was very difficult to make myself finish the second case, but I did and still have them 53 years later. My great grandmother taught me to knit when I was 8 and I am still knitting as well. I have passed my skills on to my grandchildren and I only hope that they will have the wonderful memories that I do of my grandmothers spending the time with me.

  5. Yes!! My mother taught my sister and I to embroider around ages 5 and 7. We started on dish towels with transfers, and worked into monogrammed handkerchiefs for the grandfathers and Dad. To this day, my dad is never without a handkerchief!! I have branched out into sewing, quilting, and knitting but still like to do an occasional embroidery project.

  6. I remember learning to embroider at a young age. My aunt taught me to embroider . Today I have the old fashioned embrodery patterns that were hers. The kind that is in book and you marked the places for your stitches. They most likely date back to the twenties.

  7. My mom taught me when I was very young. . . funny thing is I have an embroidery bag I keep for stressful occasions. I embroider when a loved one is sick or dying – it’s almost zenlike. . . but I always feel the warmth of my mom’s love while I’m sewing. . .

  8. Yes my first sewing projects were embroidery. I remember doing dresser scarves and pillowcases. When we got our first sewing machine I remember being allowed to sew a little. It was a treadle machine so I could not sew very fast. After my mom got better at using it my Dad put a motor on it. I still do embroidery occasionally but now more as a accent.

  9. Embroidery was definitely my first sewing! My precious grandmother, Big Mama, was incredibly patient with me as a 4-year-old, teaching me to thread a needle and take small stitches. I still have a piece of my first embroidery. Embroidery is something that I call my therapy.

  10. Yes, I remember sitting on my front porch in Pittsburgh Pa. while my mother taught me to embroider pillowcases. Im now 78 and still enjoy stiching, lacing, crocheting and mostly love making crazy quilt pillows embossed with copies of my watercolor painting. Creativity started early and has continued. Thank God!

  11. Yes, embroidery was my first love, started at a young age at school. I started sewing my family and my self as an adult. I ham now dabbling into crochet self taught.

  12. My first embroidery experience was in first grade. I went to a girl’s school run by an order of nuns which originated in Spain. Mother Ramona taught us embroidery and my first sampler was a bunny rabbit- soon followed by a Cardinal which my parents proudly framed and I still have– 55 years later. Fro there, I progressed to making some of my own clothing while still in grade school and now dabble in quilting, knitting, Counted cross-stitch, Home-Dec sewing. If only I could teach my husband and two adult sons how to sew on a Button!

  13. I started sewing around 3 1/2. My mom would thread my needle and I would sew scraps of fabric on my dolls. Mom would cut the scraps off and I would start anew another day. I learned embroidery from my mother (embroidering on gingham), knitting from an aunt I saw almost every weekend during the summer at grandma’s. When I worked at the Census Bureau during the 1980 Census, an older German woman taught me how to crochet. I have been a 4-H leader for 40 years. I have been a Girl Scout leader for 27 years. I have been in Scouting Unlimited for 20 years and in a troop and crew for almost 10. I teach loom beading, finger weaving, and make regalia for our kids. I now am costumer for our local high school–one of 11 schools chosen for the 2014 International Thespian Festival in Lincoln, NE, where my costumes were seen by over 3,000 students from around the world. I have won numerous awards for my doll clothes at the KY State Fair. Theatre students and volunteer parents are learning to sew in the high school shop, I pass on the knowledge that my 4–H leader and mother taught me. I made both of children complete at least 2 years of 4-H sewing. My son is making his own costumes for “Cons.” My daughter sews and embroiders when she has time for her nieces and now her newborn son.
    Since sewing is no longer taught in our schools, 4-H is important to teach sewing skills to future generations, so they in turn can teach another generation.

  14. I started sewing around 3 1/2. My mom would thread my needle and I would sew scraps of fabric on my dolls. Mom would cut the scraps off and I would start anew another day. I learned embroidery from my mother (embroidering on gingham), knitting from an aunt I saw almost every weekend during the summer at grandma’s. When I worked at the Census Bureau during the 1980 Census, an older German woman taught me how to crochet. I have been a 4-H leader for 40 years. I have been a Girl Scout leader for 27 years. I have been in Scouting Unlimited for 20 years and in a troop and crew for almost 10. I teach loom beading, finger weaving, and make regalia for our kids. I now am costumer for our local high school–one of 11 schools chosen for the 2014 International Thespian Festival in Lincoln, NE, where my costumes were seen by over 3,000 students from around the world. I have won numerous awards for my doll clothes at the KY State Fair. Theatre students and volunteer parents are learning to sew in the high school shop, I pass on the knowledge that my 4–H leader and mother taught me. I made both of children complete at least 2 years of 4-H sewing. My son is making his own costumes for “Cons.” My daughter sews and embroiders when she has time for her nieces and now her newborn son.
    Since sewing is no longer taught in our schools, 4-H is important to teach sewing skills to future generations, so they in turn can teach another generation.

  15. I think I was about 7 or 8 at the oldest, my grandmother took a square piece of cotton (it was probably a flour sack) and one of my coloring books. She used carbon paper to trace a picture on each of the corners and one in the middle. I embroidered each of the 5 pictures, then she crocheted an edging around the “tablecloth”. Almost 60 years later, I still have that little tablecloth, and marvel at the small stitches, and neatness of the work from the back.

  16. I learned embroidery from my Grandmother. I forget what she first taught me, but then she gave me a little tea towel that took me years to finish. I still really love embroidery and stitchery. Grandma was a great sewer, too. She could look at a garment and figure out how to make it all on her own. I have a notebook that has some drawings and pattern ideas along with recipes in it that was hers.

  17. My mother and grandmother never did much sewing when I was little except for darning socks. However, when I was about 5, my grandmother taught me how to embroider dishtowels with cute little animal transfer designs. About the same time, she gave me scraps of fabric from old clothing and showed me how to hand sew skirts for my dolls. My mother, who had no interest in sewing, saw how much I loved it and gave me my first sewing machine for my 10th birthday. I’m grateful to both of them for nurturing my early love of sewing because I still love it just as much 57 years later.

  18. I saw a project my sister was working on a crewel kit, and I loved it. Showed me how to stitch and I’ve been in trouble ever since! I taught myself (with the instruction sheet) all the other stitches. I also loved to bake. When I started high school, I was dying to get into a Home Economics class (now called FACS) which is Family and Consumer Sciences. I was hooked. There wasn’t enough hours in the day for me to sew. I went onto to college and earned a Bachelors degree in Science, which is where FACS education is taught. I taught for 30 years and loved every minute of it. The moment I’m most proud of is when early one school morning, one of my students came running to my room and said, “Mrs. Perez, I can’t wait to show you my fabric.” I guess some of the LOVE rubbed off of me onto the students! Mrs. P

  19. You look beautiful! Any chance we can see a closeup of your embroidered flowers?

    Me, I do embroidery to pass the time at long business sessions in my Quaker meeting. Quakers love to talk, and when I have an embroidery sampler in my hands, I don’t mind at all.

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