Do I Really Need to Interface? Really?

Recently, one of my daughter's friends used her Facebook page to put out a request for sewing information. "I'm new to sewing. I'm making a dress for myself, and the pattern says to interface. Do I really need to? It seems like it a lot of trouble." 

Interfacing.
Boring to look at… but using it will
give you fabulous results!

Rather than respond, "YES! YES! YES! A THOUSAND TIMES, YES," I took a few moments to collect myself, and then more gently encouraged her to indeed, take the extra time to interface. It is a little extra effort, but the results are certainly worth it.

Those of you who already interface will not need much encouragement to continue doing so. You have experienced the crisper collars, the stable button bands, and the well-turned cuffs. 

But if you have resisted interfacing, it may be for the following reasons:

1) It takes time. Yes, it does. But not that much time in comparison to the results. Your garments and projects will thank you for giving them the support they need.

2) I don't know what interfacing to use. It is overwhelming when you consider the options. Sew-in? Fusible? Knit? Woven? Lightweight? Heavyweight? And what exactly is fusible web? Your choice of interfacing will depend mainly on your fabric and what you want the interfacing to accomplish. When you're starting out, rely on a knowledgeable sales clerk and the pattern recommendations.

3) I'm not sure how to use it. The thing about sewing is that there is always something to learn–and plenty of people and places that are happy to help you. Your local shop, your friend's mom, books, YouTube, classes and workshops… the world is your educational oyster!

So, if you've not interfaced before, I hope you'll give it a try!

And for some inspiring projects and patterns, pre-order your copy of Stitch with Style–or digitally download it here.

And my question is, if you could only interface one thing on a garment, what would it be? Tough choice, eh? Let us know!

 

Happy stitching!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other sewing topics you may enjoy:

Categories

Garment Details

10 thoughts on “Do I Really Need to Interface? Really?

  1. Ladies, I’m going to have to advocate for a different garment section. When I think of interfacing, I think of collars, cuffs, waistbands, & front plackets/facings. As Rose states, the results justify the time…& it seems to me that you get the greatest return on invested time by interfacing the front plackets/facings! Not only does this improve the appearance of the front closure, but it facilitates the process of making the button holes & sewing on the buttons, as well as increases the longevity of the garment. (And I guess you could kind of “cheat” & move up into the neckline a little — haha!) Fortunately, most of us don’t have to limit ourselves to interfacing only 1 section on a garment!

  2. I agree with Passerine1. I would always interface the front plackets. It is impossible to have a good button hole without interfacing. And fortunately it runs right up into the collar. I recently bought some patterns to make for my grand-daughters. I have been making quilts for the past 15 years and ignored garment sewing. I was so saddened by the lack of couture instructions. They were horrible. I felt like I was doing slop sewing for play clothes. Not little girls dresses for church.

  3. I agree with Passerine1. I would always interface the front plackets. It is impossible to have a good button hole without interfacing. And fortunately it runs right up into the collar. I recently bought some patterns to make for my grand-daughters. I have been making quilts for the past 15 years and ignored garment sewing. I was so saddened by the lack of couture instructions. They were horrible. I felt like I was doing slop sewing for play clothes. Not little girls dresses for church.

  4. When I first started sewing my own clothes (aged 16) interfacing was a totally unknown concept to me, but I did notice that some things just didn’t look quite right. And then I discovered it – and the one thing that must be interfaced in my humble opinion is the neckline. I say this because most of what I make is done with knit fabrics which are soft and drapey, but always the neckline needs a little support.

  5. I was surprised that this wasn’t one of Rose’s three reasons one might not interface – my reason has always been the expense. Some of us sew in order to save money, and when I make, for example, a dress for my daughter from an old one of my own, it is difficult to justify a trip to the fabric store to spend money on something that’s essentially invisible. Your reasons TO use interfacing are all valid and I hear them, but I always welcome advice aimed toward those of us who sew for practical reasons — to save money and to avoid virgin materials whenever possible. Just a newbie’s two cents!

Comment