Inspiration From Editing Garment Instructions

How many times does each story in a magazine get read by an editor before it goes to press? In my case here at Stitch and Modern Patchwork, at minimum, eight times.  That’s a lot of time spent pouring over the projects, and in the case of our The Unofficial Downton Abbey Sews issue, reading instructions on sewing clothes.

The Boy’s Sailor Jacket by Tina Lewis. 

I have a quilting background, and have dipped my toe into the garment-sewing world. But my time spent working on the Downton Abbey special issue of Stitch meant I was neck-deep in garment instructions this spring.

While I think all of the projects in the issue were stunning, I did have a few that became favorites during my hours of editing.

Who can resist the Boy’s Sailor Jacket by Tina Lewis? It’s adorable, fresh and fun. I also love Tina’s Black Lace Tabard, which appeared on the cover of the issue. The flower detailing is impressive.

The Valet’s Nightshirt, by Melanie McFarland, looks both cozy and comfortable for a man to wear. I also love Melanie Smith’s Modern Jean Jodhpurs, though the idea of making my own jeans is a little intimidating!

Like me, if you’re looking to branch out into sewing clothes, and need some inspiration, another resource is Burda Style. You can get a free trial issue of that publication in the Sew Daily Shop.

Do you have favorite projects from the Stitch Downton Abbey special issue? As always, we love to hear your feedback. Leave it here.

Other sewing topics you may enjoy:

Categories

Sew Daily Blog
Abby Kaufman

About Abby Kaufman

Abby Kaufman is assistant editor of Stitch magazine. When she's not scoping out new fabrics for her collection, Abby enjoys outdoor activities, and spending time with her husband and two dogs. 

5 thoughts on “Inspiration From Editing Garment Instructions

  1. Editing tip for the 7th most commonly confused word. pore/pour.

    Question: When you’re attentively studying, are you poring over or pouring over the materials?

    Answer: poring

    How to Remember It:

    One reason this word trips us up is that both pour and pore are often followed by over.

    But in this case it probably helps to think literally. When we’re intently studying something, nothing is actually pouring (i.e., flowing, leaking) onto the object of study; in fact, if something did pour onto what you’re poring over, your task would be far more difficult. The less familiar verb pore is correct.

    Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/top-ten-lists/top-10-commonly-confused-words-vol-1/pore-pour.html#DCHctHXtD3avGYu3.99

  2. Question: When you’re attentively studying, are you poring over or pouring over the materials?

    Answer: poring

    How to Remember It:

    One reason this word trips us up is that both pour and pore are often followed by over.

    But in this case it probably helps to think literally. When we’re intently studying something, nothing is actually pouring (i.e., flowing, leaking) onto the object of study; in fact, if something did pour onto what you’re poring over, your task would be far more difficult. The less familiar verb pore is correct.

    Read more at http://www.merriam-webster.com/top-ten-lists/top-10-commonly-confused-words-vol-1/pore-pour.html#DCHctHXtD3avGYu3.99

  3. Come on Abby, you can totally make those jeans! Not much different than ordinary pants, just thicker fabric and a bigger needle. 🙂

    – Melanie Smith

  4. You can totally make those jeans Abby! Just like ordinary pants but with a thicker fabric and needle. 🙂 Thanks for the mention in your email!

Comment