I Owe It All To Mom

With Mother's Day coming up, it got me to thinking about my own mother and how grateful I am to her for giving me a love of sewing. My mother is an exceptional seamstress, and I grew up in a home of several sewing machines, ranging from the fancy to the antique (a Singer treadle machine was converted to a vanity for my teen bedroom!)


My mother's childhood
sewing machine.


My mom, around the time
she was teaching me to sew.

When I think about all the patience my mother practiced when teaching me to sew, I can get a bit emotional. Only now at this point in my life can I really appreciate what it took for her to sit down with a determined, but impatient teenager and show me how to evenly gather a ruffle for a challenging summer top that I simply had to make in a gorgeous navy and white Hawaiian print. And how at almost midnight, when I was nearly in tears because I really wanted to wear that top the next day, she sagely advised me, "If your sewing is starting to make you cry, it's time to stop sewing."

That's the kind of advice that's useful in a wide variety of circumstances.  

Sewing has bonded us our whole lives, and it is just between the two of us. Neither of my other sisters got the sewing bug. In fact, my mother mounted her childhood sewing machine on a block of wood and presented it to me (it really sews!). I keep it on the shelf in my office to remind me of that bond we share.

Sewing has given me limitless hours of pleasure, and I doubt I would have ever stitched a stitch, let alone the many garments I've made since that ruffled summer top, if not for her patient tutelage.

For loads of gifts and patterns you can give your mother, check out the Sew Daily Shop.

Did your mother teach you to sew? I would love to hear all about it!

Happy stitching!

Other sewing topics you may enjoy:

Categories

Sew Daily Blog
Amber

About Amber

Amber Eden is the editor of Stitch and SewDaily.com. She LOVES sewing and editing Stitch and SewDaily.com. She also loves dance, yoga, iced decaf triple espressos, and her two golden retrievers. She divides her time between Boston and New York.

37 thoughts on “I Owe It All To Mom

  1. My mother wasn’t around very much though she gave me some embroidery bits when she realised I enjoyed stitching. It was my Grandmother who showed me how to use a sewing machine and used to provide with with fabrics and trimmings etc so I could make tissue box covers etc which she used to sell at local coffee mornings to raise money for charity, along with her fairy cakes.

    I’m still struggling to get to grips with a new sewing machine at the moment so finding hand sewing easier right now – I make miniature teddy bears 🙂

  2. Your comments today brought a huge lump to my throat and tears to my eyes. We were not well off when I was growing up and my mother used to take in sewing to make ends meet. She was an excellent seamstress with a number of regular clients. I can remember seeing wedding dresses being fitted that were so large and ornate they could hardly pass through a doorway! I can also remember getting up in the middle of the night to find my mother bent over her sewing table, a Cavallah Kings curling it’s smoke into the air as she worked away to finish a garment as quickly as possible. If anyone remonstrated with her about her smoking, she would smile and say that while her Cavallah was smoking in the ashtray, she had company! I can also remember her getting up the next morning, exhausted, to go to work as a sales assistant in a bookshop. No, my mother never taught me to sew. I hated sewing with every fibre of my being because of what it was doing to my mother. However, when I had my own daughters, did I regret not learning to sew when she offered to teach me! My youngest daughter (now over 30 and with a home of her own) is a keen sewer and has three beautiful daughters for whom she sews. She believes that her gran still helps her when she has sewing or crochet problems! She maintains that every time she hits a sewing or crochet snag, she’ll look up and say: “Hey, Gran! I need some help here!” and without fail, her problem will be solved. She will be given the solution and she firmly maintains my mother is helping her. So, my mom didn’t teach me to sew, she’s teaching my daughter.

  3. My amazing mum taught me to hand sew, machine sew, knit and crochet! She was, and still is, the main inspiration for my creative side and the one who gave me the foundation skills I’ve built on to develop my own handmade businesses. And it is so great to see her bringing my children simple craft kits to try out. 🙂

  4. Id wake to the brrr brrr of my mum’s Singer industrial machine. Teddy bears, aprons and baby dresses and jackets brought in some money for the household. My brother and i would snip threads and stack the pile of pieces ready for mum to pick them up and sew the next seam. Mum bought me my first Singer machine when i turned 13. By 20 i was making a skirt over night for a friend. I made a lace overlaid formal dress with a deep v back and mother of pearl buttons. Sewing is one of my passions set in motion by mum’s love for us and then love for me… she was so patient. I teach whatever i can to whoever i can because i appreciate the joy that can be had with the first empowering instruction. Thank you mum. (I lost my mum to cancer in 1993. I miss her each day.)

  5. Yes, I credit my Mom with teaching me sewing (knitting, crochet, embroidery, needlepoint etc.) Her first job back to the work force when my brother started college was teaching sewing at the local Singer store. I honor her with a small picture my Dad kept close by that I keep by my sewing machine. How I wish she could see what the new machines do – all those special stitches and no “cogs” to change!

  6. Yes, my mother taught me to sew. By the timeI was ten or so, I hand-hemmed all the gathered skirts and dresses she made for me. She taught me to embroider, and bought me many sets of printed pillow cases and showed me how to do the stitches she knew. And she taught me to knit. I went on to learn to crochet, spin, and weave, which she didn’t teach me; she did prepare me to learn every kind of fiber-related activity, however. Now when I sew for her, she will tell me she can’t do this or that as well as I can. She’s 93, and she can’t sew at all anymore, but I remind her that I wouldn’t be able to either, if she hadn’t taught me.

  7. Yes, my mother taught me to sew, embroider and knit. My grandmother taught me to quilt and crochet and another grandmother embroidered. It is in my genes. I remember coming home from school and my mother would be at the sewing machine – always. When I was old enough for 4-H, she was our leader. Sewing, to me, was as natural and wonderful as breathing — still is.

  8. My mom and her mother taught me to hand sew, but it was my sister that really taught me to sew. She had learned how in a home economics class in high school. From there I have learned mostly through trial and error. I love sewing and cherish the memories of the early years sitting with my mom and grandma sewing and watching TV together. My girls have not yet caught the bug but there is still hope cause I was in college before I really caught it.

  9. My Mom was an excellent seamstress, who took courses to make tailored coats and suits in the ’60’s. She turned out beautiful, professional work, but never enjoyed it. She only did it to get the clothes she couldn’t afford, not for the love of sewing. I hated home ec, sewing and refused to sew for years until a friend of mine dragged me into a fabric store and wouldn’t let me leave until I had picked something out. I reluctantly decided to make a dress, but was intimidated by all the difficult processes I had learned in school. It was my Mom who showed me about fusible interfacing, how to mark by clipping, and lots of other shortcuts. I was hooked, and have never stopped sewing and quilting since. I thank Mom for teaching me the joy of sewing for the love of it.

  10. My grandmother made beautiful dresses for me as a child. In fact, I still have a baby doll wearing a dress made out of silk from a parachute my uncle brought back from World War II. After she died, my mom would make lovely clothing for me. When I was a young mother, my mom made coats and dresses for my girls. Now I am making little outfits for my grandchildren. Everything seems to come full circle.

  11. My mom could sew, but didn’t particularly enjoy it. Since she didn’t want to spend a lot of time teaching me, she taught me everything she knew in one garment. It was a wool, plaid, pleated skirt with tabs, zipper, waistband, and of course a hem. At 12 or 13 I was thrilled with my very first garment and wore it all the time. I took off from there and ended up majoring in Clothing and Textiles. She always encouraged and supported my sewing endeavors and we remained best friends till her death.

  12. My mom taught me to sew by hand and machine. She got my grandma’s foot treadle Singer when Grandma died. It was the only machine Mom sewed on until she died at age 83. I got my first machine, a portable, when I was a freshman in college. Mom and I made my wedding dress, she was an accomplished seamstress. The skills she passed on to me are precious. I have passed them on to my 3 daughters. Whenever I fondle a bolt of fabric or sit at my machine I feel mom with me.

  13. Wow, your mother is beautiful, and you look just like her. Well, except hair color of course. Stunning.

    My mother did not teach me to sew. I took a beginners class about 10 years ago, but that’s all the formal teaching I’ve had. That’s surely why I don’t get very many things made, and why I end up picking out stitches so often. I really need to take some classes.

  14. My mother did, indeed, teach me to sew. She learned from her mother who was a very accomplished seamstress. My mom often sewed out of necessity for my siblings and me, but I always thought she enjoyed it. I learned to sew on a treadle machine, too, and it is still in the family. My mother was also patient and was very willing to help when needed. I sewed for a lot of years, took classes, and tried all kinds of garments, but I don’t sew much any more. I do make a dress or skirt occasionally. I have a lot of stuff in my stash that needs to get used, so I have been trying to make time to sew garments as well as quilt, which is now my passion. Thanks for sharing about your mom. She’s as beautiful as you are!!

  15. My mother taught me to sew when I was about 10 years old. Since I was always n a hurry with a low frustration point my mom would usually finish the project for me. Now I am a real sewer, so I guess it did stick. My mom would make the costumes for my ballet class, school plays and the sweetest pinafore dresses.She also made doll dress and was asked to supply a fancy Washinagton, DC store. But she was not able to keep up with the sales and did not have the capital to set up a “real” business. I remember the wonderful outfits she and my Aunt Clara used to make for me. My mother lost interest when I went into high school but my aunt took over. She designed things for me. She was so talented, and she would make the “coolest” things out of the most unexpected material. I remember a gold lame mini dress she made for me and someone had come up behind me and burned a hole in the sleeve. I was so upset because this dress was so special. My aunt, not to be undone pulled out more material and withing minutes I have a new sleeve set in. I also remember wearing a unique creation to a party at the Washington Press Club. Everyone was complimenting me on my dress. I went to New York a few months later and an exact copy of this dress was displayed in the window. I suppose imitation is a form of flattery. At least she knew for sure she had real talent.

  16. I think your mother’s sewing machine was a Gateway, the same as mine. as a child I wanted my own, my parents could not afford one, and was told I could use my Grandmothers treadle. I could not get the rhythm to sew on it.. A cousin gave me her Gateway as she had outgrown it.
    My mother did teach me to sew after she got an electric American Beauty. I still have my Gateway and my mothers.
    She helped me make my wedding dress and those of my brides maids.

  17. Mother’s Day brings a lump to my throat, like so many, but not for the same reasons. My mother was a skilled seamstress, and made pajamas for the entire family throughout my childhood. She made Easter dresses, school clothes, costumes and even the hats that were stylish/required for church in the 50’s and 60’s. I think she did make an attempt at teaching me to sew, but I was not interested in spending any extra time with my mother. Fittings were frustrating for both of us; the finished garments always had small pins embedded in the seams, and my mother was prone to frightening rages. She was physically and mentally abusive, and I wanted nothing to do with anything associated with her. Nonetheless, she somehow indoctrinated me! When I got married, I suddenly “needed” to know how to sew as well as cook. I learned from a library book and the information included in patterns, and my mother-in-law was supportive and helpful, though she lived 3000 miles away. I didn’t consult my mother and I don’t remember her reaction to my sewing efforts. We are estranged now, as we have been most of my adult life, but at this point, it is not so painful anymore. And I do thank her for the example of her sewing; I don’t know if I would have even thought of it without her example, and I’m sure that my ability to “teach myself” was based in observation over the years. I am SO grateful that I did not miss out on the pleasures of sewing and especially quilting. Thanks to my mother!

  18. We have sewing ladies all over my family. My Great Gramma and Granny on Dad’s side sewed. My Aunt still quilts with a long arm machine. The first machine I ever played on was Granny’s Singer Treadle machine. Great Gran and Nana on my Mom’s side sewed, embroidered and knitted. Two of my husbands Aunties sew also.
    Mom knits and quilts. She taught me to sew at age 7 and continued to teach me through high school and college. At age 8 or 9 our girl scout troop went to the “old folks home” and the ladies taught me embroidery and crochet. I enjoyed learning from them. They told the best stories. I taught my nieces to crochet last year to pass it on.
    I still call Mom for help on projects if I get stuck. I love being close to so many who sew and create.

  19. My mother was a wonderful seamstress and taught me how to sew, hand and machine, at a very young age. I remember making my elementary school graduation dress and loving it! What a feeling, one I’ve recreated many times over the years. Thanks Mom! And when I need the help, my mother, who is now gone many years, is still helping me! I just ask!

  20. I’m so overwhelmed with emotion after reading this post. It reminds me of the days I would run in and out of the house for quick snack or water breaks in between my bouts of worm digging, rock collecting, and fighting outside. I would run in the house and see my mom at the kitchen table with the measuring tape around her neck and fabric neatly pinned while she threaded her machine. She always seemed to be threading the machine but knowing how fragile thread can be now that I’m older and have my own sewing machine, I can imagine that in the same time it took me to beat up a neighbors kid she had made significant progress on her project indoors and broke the thread. I even remember her being at the sewing machine when I mouthed off a few harsh words that I have spent more than a decade wishing I could take back.

    My journey was a slow path that meandered through cross-stitch, needlepoint, drawing, painting, mixed media involving wood and glass and alas the Singer Quilters Confidence that makes me grimace deep down when I have to send off for servicing. I have decided to make art quilting my mainstay to pay homage to my mother who didn’t realize how much of a foundation she laid for me when she didn’t think I was even paying attention. I sew because of my mother and it is a great bonding factor in our relationship. She has tried to teach me how to sew but I frustrate her greatly with my get it done approach and hers being more of one rooted in respect for the process. But despite all that, nothing gets in the way of that mutual sense of serendipity we both feel when we walk down the isle in Joann Fabrics that is the perfect fabric match for the project we have simmering in our hearts. Nothing beats that.

  21. I wanted to sew when my great aunt Bernice made me a play dress out of an old bedspread my grandmother had. I remember it to this day! Learning to sew was difficult to begin with. My mother had an old singer that she didn’t use (this was in the 50’s). It had a bad needle and tension problems, but I didn’t know it at the time. I finally grew up enough to have home ec in school but still did not relate a bad needle and tension problems to the singer. Had my second home economics class in high school and was told I was not a good seamstress. Decided that I would learn on my own. My grandmother loaned me $75 to buy a used Singer sewing machine in the mid sixties and it was sweet! I then started sewing lots of stuff. Some was great and some was really bad! The thing is I learned. I am still learning. I recently retired and now get to sew everyday. A chunk of my income comes from sewing…imagine that. I get paid for doing what I love! I still have people who don’t like what I do and the way I do it, but the thing is, I like it. Enough people like it to buy it. I sew everything; clothes for my daughter, clothes for my granddaughters, art quilts, traditional quilts, hand bags, tote bags, home interior stuff, on and on. Now I sew on my Janome, my Esante’ Babylock, my good old Singer Overlock. So I figure I have had a million teachers at this point with all of the books, magazines, web sites and blogs. I just say go for it if you want to sew, sew! You will be good enough.

  22. I wanted to sew when my great aunt Bernice made me a play dress out of an old bedspread my grandmother had. I remember it to this day! Learning to sew was difficult to begin with. My mother had an old singer that she didn’t use (this was in the 50’s). It had a bad needle and tension problems, but I didn’t know it at the time. I finally grew up enough to have home ec in school but still did not relate a bad needle and tension problems to the singer. Had my second home economics class in high school and was told I was not a good seamstress. Decided that I would learn on my own. My grandmother loaned me $75 to buy a used Singer sewing machine in the mid sixties and it was sweet! I then started sewing lots of stuff. Some was great and some was really bad! The thing is I learned. I am still learning. I recently retired and now get to sew everyday. A chunk of my income comes from sewing…imagine that. I get paid for doing what I love! I still have people who don’t like what I do and the way I do it, but the thing is, I like it. Enough people like it to buy it. I sew everything; clothes for my daughter, clothes for my granddaughters, art quilts, traditional quilts, hand bags, tote bags, home interior stuff, on and on. Now I sew on my Janome, my Esante’ Babylock, my good old Singer Overlock. So I figure I have had a million teachers at this point with all of the books, magazines, web sites and blogs. I just say go for it if you want to sew, sew! You will be good enough.

  23. I am the fourth generation of sewers in our family! My great-grandmother was widowed at an early age, and had two small children to raise alone. She was a skilled seamstress, so used her skills to provide for her children. She would move in with a family, and sew complete wardrobes for each family member, then move on to the next family!
    My grandmother was a good seamstress as well as my mother! They didn’t believe in ‘store bought’ clothing, and made clothes for everyone in the family!
    So, naturally, I believe that this was the way ALL girls should be! I was the oldest of four children, so my mother didn’t have time to show me much about sewing. But, I had a wonderful Home Economics teacher who taught me SO many things about sewing and tailoring! When I retired from teaching, I decided to sew for others full time. And now I sew everything from baby clothes to prom dresses, you name it!!!

  24. Your words reminded me of my sewing influences. My mom and dad were both quite talented in the sewing realm. My dad sewed for his career, he was a tailor… He worked in many places… A tailor shop, teaching inmates in the maximum security of a reformatory, and at home in the workshop he built.. He would design and sew the major items that he made for others. For our family, he also sewed our major items…it did seem to be the last minute… Saturday before Easter, the week before Christmas… I remember having coats that were tailored just by him.
    My mom didn’t sew as much, since Dad did the main items, however she also had formal training. All our dresses and other items were always special because she added the couture touch, the flowers, the special look. She crocheted, knitted, rug hooked,and embroidered. We were not wealthy, growing up we didn’t have a lot of clothes but they always fit well and looked sharp.
    I learned to sew, I think, by osmosis… I always knew how, besides if I did make a mistake, Dad would take it out and fix it! Once I left home to start my teaching career, I did take a tailoring course to learn about the special touches.
    Over the years, now that both my parents are gone, I enjoy using my mother’s thimbles, seeing my dad’s scissors collection hanging on my wall, and having his treadle sewing machine dominating the foyer to our home… What a lovely heritage that surrounds us.
    One of my children has also inherited the sewing gene and finds sewing as relaxing and as enjoyable as I do. Since I retired, my day is complete if I get a chance to sew, quilt.

  25. My grandmother and mother both sewed, everything I think. I remember mom making my sister a winter coat using an old coat of hers or someone’s anyway. I got a sewing machine very much like the one pictured, except mine was green. I started on doll clothes and it was a challenge for mom to explain why darts had to be put in and why the crotch was curved. I took sewing at school, and was totally frustrated with the teacher so mom helped me do “out of the box” trim on an a-line skirt and dress. I never looked back. I sewed for school plays in Jr. High and now I mostly do alterations on everything from t-shirts to wedding dresses. I still call mom and tell her what I am doing, ask for her opinion. I want her to know that I couldn’t do all this without her encouragement and guidance.

  26. My grandmother and mother both sewed, everything I think. I remember mom making my sister a winter coat using an old coat of hers or someone’s anyway. I got a sewing machine very much like the one pictured, except mine was green. I started on doll clothes and it was a challenge for mom to explain why darts had to be put in and why the crotch was curved. I took sewing at school, and was totally frustrated with the teacher so mom helped me do “out of the box” trim on an a-line skirt and dress. I never looked back. I sewed for school plays in Jr. High and now I mostly do alterations on everything from t-shirts to wedding dresses. I still call mom and tell her what I am doing, ask for her opinion. I want her to know that I couldn’t do all this without her encouragement and guidance.

  27. Yes, my mother taught me to sew the same year my daughter was born, now 15. I felt the need to learn when all the new dresses and crafts were directed to the baby. I missed having new clothes, pillowcases, curtains and others any time she went to the store and found new fabric to spent her $ on. Yes, I learned by jealousy, but now with my mother gone (10 years now) I can proudly say that I saw for my daughter, for me, my sisters, and my nieces…AND my daughter is into it and can saw her own bits and pieces. So proud of her and so proud of my mom.

    Thanks for this article brings happy memories and tears to my day!

  28. Your mom is so beautiful. No wonder your heart is hers for teaching you to sew. My mother, nor none of my 3 sisters ever had the sewing bug, but I was born with enough of it to make up for all of them. It was my darling Nana who taught me to sew. First to hand embroider and fine hand stitching. Then, at the age of 6, she sat me on her lap at her treadle machine; she ran the pedal and I drove the fabric. She has been gone since I was 14, over 50 years now. But I carry our passion for the both of us still. In my 64 years, my only daughter has never expressed the desire to learn to sew. But, my macho, football player grandsons (ages 15 and 9) both wanted me to teach them how to sew, and have made quilts that have gone on to win ribbons. I am so happy to have someone to carry on my tradition, if not my passion. I am learning to love football.
    Happy Mother’s Day !

  29. I was fortunate to have not only a Mom that sewed but a Grandmother, a Great Aunt and both my Mom’s sister’s! Many of the supplies I still use today are from them! I learned on a motorized Singer 99K but had two child size sewing machines that were handed down as well. They were donated to neighbors children at some point.
    The sewing class in junior HS was somewhat helpful! The real motivator was all the beautiful clothes my Aunt Helen made for me, The hand me downs from my older cousin, tailored suits hand made by a relative , helped improved my taste. The sixties and bell bottoms and ‘Mod’ clothes not in my Mom’s budget started me off to a great beginning! My babysitting money was always spent wisely!

  30. My mom taught me to sew. When she was able to get a new sewing machine for herself, I inherited her old one, which went forwards and backwards! I also stitched things at my grandmother’s houses, but I disliked the machine that had a knee lever to make it work.
    I was a tall, skinny child, and my mother made so many of my outfits as I was growing up! These were always special to me, and let me know how much my mother loved me.
    When it was time to take Home Economics in junior high school, my teachers were blown away by how advanced my sewing skills already were! They had just purchased a new Bernina sewing machine, and most of the other kids were leary of using it, but I preferred to sew with it.
    Several of my outfits have won ribbons at our local county fair. I just purchased some fabric for dresses for myself, and I wouldn’t be able to do this without my mom sharing her love of sewing with me!

  31. My experience is the exact opposite. My mother didn’t particularly like to sew and wasn’t very good at it. She refused to teach me to sew, stating that “when you get into Jr High” – yes I’m so old that I had 3 mandatory years of ‘Home Ec’ – ” someone will teach you the right way”. I am eternally grateful to her for her stand, because I was blessed with a fabulous teacher who loved to sew (and was also a disciplinarian about doing things the “right” way). She taught me to sew, and to believe that with time and work I could learn to make anything (and she was right). Later (in high school) when she had become head of the department, she institued a needlework class, where she taught the fundamentals of knitting, crocheting, embroidery and smocking. While I had experience with all of these except for smocking, I took the class just to have a period every day where I could sit and knit (made 2 sweaters that year). Jeanette was deterined to share her love of needlecraft. Even more importantly for me, she corrected the ‘bad’ habits in my knitting (which made my gauge and tension hard to control) and to this day (more that 30 years later) I remember her standing behind my chair every class, not allowing me to continue my bad habits. I am forever in her debt. (I’ve added needlepoint, counted cross, harganger, beading, and quilting to the mix since then.) It doesn’t have to be your mother, but I think all of us who engage in handcrafts owe something to those who had the patience to see us through the initial learning curve.

  32. Oh! you bet it was Mom who taught me to sew on the old Singer. And yes, it is bringing tears to my eyes that I can’t send her something other than my love this Mother’s Day. I miss her so and this will be my tribute to her this day. Before the Singer she so lovingly taught me hand sewing, crocheting, knitting, a variety of handywork and yes, in the kitchen too… baking, cooking, canning. She was the ultimate housewife and worked outside the home too. I can so cleary see the cool umpire dress I made… my first zipper! She must have made me rip it out 3 times before it came out right. Best practice ever. But boy, was I proud to wear that dress! Then came the Make It Yourself With Wool contest that I entered in my senior year of high school. Although I had help from my Home Ec teacher (why the heck do schools not have home ec any more??) it was Mom who bought the very expensive wool and notions, encouraged me and nudged me to complete what turned out to be a stunning winning outfit. Another proud moment. Mom took up quilting and embroidery in her 80’s and today I am the proud owner of her amazing high tech embroidery machine. Everytime I sit down to stitch something up for my children, granddaughters or my home I am channeling Mom. She is with me when I am sewing and crafting and cooking. And as I rummage through the treasures of lace and fabric and buttons and notions that have been lovingly savd by her mother and grandmother, I find ways to incorporate these antique items into the bags and garments and other fun things I make so a part of Mom and Gramma will be with us all for always.
    I love you Mom.

  33. Mom was always sewing. Some of my earliest memories involve sorting buttons from her button box, and standing next to her while she sewed, fascinated with the needle going up and down. When I expressed an interest, she sat me down at her unthreaded machine with a piece of notebook paper, and told me I could have fabric when I could stitch a whole piece of paper straight on the lines! I made my first garment, an apron made from 1/4″ gingham (so I’d have straight lines to follow!) when I was 8, and I’ve continued to sew ever since.

    Mother helped her children believe we could do anything, if we put our minds to it. She was a lifelong learner, always trying new things and supporting our educational endeavors–in and out of the classroom. Because of her, sewing is “what I do”, part of my identity, how I express my creativity and how I serve.

  34. My mum taught me how to sew my first blouse, my first camisole and she also taught me how to crochet and to knit. She used to sew her own clothes and when I showed an interest, she very patiently showed me how to use the sewing machine which is a rare model – A Speed Queen – not a Singer machine.

    I still have the machine and have now bought a new one for my self. I sew my own clothes, curtains, cushion covers and gifts to others for birthday, weddings etc… I have two daughters and they’re both creative in their own way. I have passed on my knowledge of sewing, knitting and crochet to them. We often share ideas with each other and have lots of fun whenever we go shopping for fabrics. The girls love experimenting and have come up with fun clothes for themselves.

    It is my hope that they not break this wonderful chain and that they pass it on to their children in future.

  35. My mum taught me how to sew my first blouse, my first camisole and she also taught me how to crochet and to knit. She used to sew her own clothes and when I showed an interest, she very patiently showed me how to use the sewing machine which is a rare model – A Speed Queen – not a Singer machine.

    I still have the machine and have now bought a new one for my self. I sew my own clothes, curtains, cushion covers and gifts to others for birthday, weddings etc… I have two daughters and they’re both creative in their own way. I have passed on my knowledge of sewing, knitting and crochet to them. We often share ideas with each other and have lots of fun whenever we go shopping for fabrics. The girls love experimenting and have come up with fun clothes for themselves.

    It is my hope that they not break this wonderful chain and that they pass it on to their children in future.

  36. My grandmother taught me to sew. I was a young teen and she was teaching me to sew a “granny dress” Ours was a difficult relationship (for reasons we need not go into here….) but now that I look back, she was pleased to teach me to sew. Now, as a grandmother, I’ll teach my grandson to sew…
    Charlotte

  37. I had to laugh at your impatience and wanting to do gathering as a beginner. I, too, had to start with gathering a sleeve for a doll dress when I was in first grade. I was also very impatient. I believe my mom said basically the same thing as your mom. She had wanted me to try something simple but not I just had to do this dress. I can’t remember if it ever got finished. To this day though, the more complicated the pattern the better I like it. I made a lot of my daughter’s dresses as she was growing up. They had to be fancy, my idea, not hers. Pintucks, gathering, lace edging, lace overlays and other such fun. I made a couple of dresses for her which I then cross-stitched Winne-the-Pooh designs. I entered those dresses and several others in a local fair winning ribbons, some were even blue. I did a lot of hand sewing too making Barbie dresses and items for my troll. My mom learned to sew by watching her mother. She made all of her clothes as well as mine. I didn’t have a store bought dress until I went to work and bought my own dress. Sewing is very relaxing and fun. It is a creative art, taking a piece of fabric and making/turning it into something else. It makes the fabric come alive. Love to sew.

Comment