How a Project Becomes a Project

For the most part, projects for Stitch are created by the talented community of designers who contribute to the magazine. But every once in a while the editors at Stitch have to step up the plate and develop designs for the magazine. Take the Stitch Spring 2013 issue. Although we received some gorgeous projects for the Spa Treatment section, we didn't get that most essential of spa gear: the fuzzy robe.


The robe sketch.


The final Comfy Fuzzy Robe. 

 Rose's robe lives out its days
as office mascot.

That's when Assistant Editor Rose DeBoer stepped up to the plate (with just a tiny bit of nudging) and volunteered to be the designer.

The first step was to create a sketch, because editors' projects have to go through the same selection process as everyone else. Rose developed a rough sketch based on a kimono style. I completed the final sketch, and we selected fabric swatches to attach to the sketch for presentation.

Once the robe had passed muster for selection and fabric was in hand, it was on to construction, and that meant a full weekend of pattern drafting and muslin-making–the hood was a particular challenge. Then it took most of another weekend of sewing.

Finally, she had finished the Comfy Fuzzy Robe and we loved it! From there, the pattern was sent to our pattern grader for final tweaking, and the robe went on to be a star at the photo shoot.

You may wonder what happens to projects after their day in the limelight. Well, in this particular case the Comfy Fuzzy Robe has gone on to become an ad hoc office member, supervising us from its corner dress form. I keep campaigning to take the robe home, but I have a feeling it's intended for one of Rose's lucky daughters.

To get the feel of being your own designer and create elegant garments with simple sewing techniques, check out Shape Shape 2 in the Sew Daily Shop.

Have you ever just sat down and designed and made something that you really want to have in your home or closet? I would love to hear about your own adventures in creativity.

Happy stitching!

 

 

 

 

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Amber

About Amber

Amber Eden is the editor of Stitch and SewDaily.com. She LOVES sewing and editing Stitch and SewDaily.com. She also loves dance, yoga, iced decaf triple espressos, and her two golden retrievers. She divides her time between Boston and New York.

9 thoughts on “How a Project Becomes a Project

  1. My project which became a PROJECT was that I made my daughter’s wedding gown AND it was a wonderful experience. Even got an old taylor’s dummy and learnt loads in the process. It was truly memorable & unforgettable.

  2. “Snoopy Point” at the Grand Canyon! So much fun!
    Thank you for letting me share this story with you I was dying to share it with someone!
    Susan

  3. I don’t know what happened but I will try it again!
    I am an artist at the Grand Canyon in Arizona and taken commissions for graphic illustrations for the Grand canyon Chamber of Commerce.
    While trying to locate a new embroidery attachment at Odegards in Flagstaff I came across some amazing sunset fabric in hues of red, pink, purple, orange and yellow. So I bought a yard.
    It is one of those fabrics you buy for your stash that you hate to cut up. So I folded it and set to the side in my sewing area where I could see and admire it and waited for “the” inspiration to come. Day by day I would glance over at this beautiful fabric trying to remember what it reminded me of, then I had it…..the colors were almost identical to those in a piece of artwork I had done of the Grand Canyon at sunset in Neon Prismacolor pencils. Eureka! I had my project for this special fabric! I already had the designs too, all I had to do was transfer the drawing onto the fabric. So I started it immediately.
    I’m working on it now, I’ve machine quilted the drawing and am working on shading in the rock formations of the Vishnu Temples (more commonly referred to as “Snoopy Point”) with Prismacolor and Derwent soft colored pencils.
    Thank you for letting me share this story, I was dying to tell someone!
    Susan

  4. I looked into my sewing closet at my stacks of material & decided to do something worthwhile with them. I started sewing string backpacks to put in shoe boxes for Operation Christmas Child who send things to needy children all over the world. I made my own pattern and have tweaked it several times. I enlisted my friends to help and we have had four sewing days working on them so far. Two of my friends pack over 700 boxes so I decided that number would be a good goal. I have now cut out over 700 backpacks with over 130 already finished. My friend wrote an article about it & it made all the local papers! I am getting more volunteers. It is the most rewarding sewing project I have ever done.

  5. I often create one of a kind things that I can’t find elsewhere. My most recent project was custom cushions for my window seat. We found the perfect upholstery fabric at the Mill End store and then I accented it with embroidered throw pillows with a variety of Northwoods designs. It makes me smile every time I look at it.

  6. My project became a project when for the 4th time I’d purchases light jackets that didnt’ fit right. SO I designed the perfect jacket in my head. I should have drawn out the design idea on paper, but that was a step I skipped. Then I cut out the pattern for a polar fleece jacket using the picture in my head. So far I’ve made 4 different versions of the same jacket design. Different colors and closures, but I love the fit and feel of Jackets made just for me!!

  7. I was taught to sew at the age of 5 by my Headmistress, we started with simple embroidery, unpicking anything that didn’t pass her exacting standards. By the age of 6 we had all made a lined needlecase with embroidery on the front and name on the back – I still use this, though it is getting a little tatty now. In my last year at Primary School I made a fully lined tailored dress sewn entirely by hand, of which I was so proud, I made it in a larger size and wore it right through the late ’60’s and 70’s whilst at college.
    I am now 60, I still sew all manner of things, my sewing group of 10 women is at the moment making embroidered and stumpwork pennants all with a Knights Templar theme for the local care home. I live in a village in the UK called Templecombe which is named after the Templars who were based here from 1185 to the 1300’s.

  8. I was taught to sew at the age of 5 by my Headmistress, we started with simple embroidery, unpicking anything that didn’t pass her exacting standards. By the age of 6 we had all made a lined needlecase with embroidery on the front and name on the back – I still use this, though it is getting a little tatty now. In my last year at Primary School I made a fully lined tailored dress sewn entirely by hand, of which I was so proud, I made it in a larger size and wore it right through the late ’60’s and 70’s whilst at college.
    I am now 60, I still sew all manner of things, my sewing group of 10 women is at the moment making embroidered and stumpwork pennants all with a Knights Templar theme for the local care home. I live in a village in the UK called Templecombe which is named after the Templars who were based here from 1185 to the 1300’s.

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